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This Pyramids you did not found in Egypt

While the most famous pyramids were built in Giza by the ancient Egyptians, this striking architectural structure has been created by many different cultures and civilisations through history. From the Aztec pyramids of Mexico to temples of Indonesia, and even modern-day buildings from the last century, here’s our pick of the world’s most intriguing pyramids outside of Egypt.

Nubian pyramids, Sudan

Nubian pyramids, Jebel Barkal, Sudan

The Nubian pyramids that is in eastern Sudan are far smaller than the great pyramids of Giza but no less remarkable. Located 200km northeast of modern-day Sudanese capital Khartoum, was the heart of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom, between the 8th century BC and 4th century AD. Spread across three sites (including the ancient city of Meroë), the area is home to more than 200 red-brick pyramids, built as tombs for Kushite rulers, that reach up to 30m tall. 

Nubian pyramids, Jebel Barkal, Sudan

Over the centuries, it demanded for historical base now it becomes an UNESCO World Heritage Site.  Some of the pyramids in particular were partially destroyed by Italian treasure hunter Giuseppe Ferlini between 1800 and 1870, and modern-day threats include drifting sands and rising Nile flood water. Some of the smaller pyramids have been restored to their former glory but even those in states of decay still look impressive.


Pyramids of the Moon and Sun, San Juan Teotihuacan, Mexico

Pyramids of the Moon and Sun, San Juan Teotihuacán, Mexico

With a base of around 220 by 230m, the Sun pyramids is the world’s third-largest pyramid. While it's sister temple, Pyramid of the Moon, isn't quite so shineing for only130 by 156m, it's also no less impressive, standing in front of the imposing Cerro Gordo mountain, which it’s said to resemble. They're both located in Mexico’s San Juan Teotihuacán, an ancient Mesoamerican citadel also known as City of the Gods.

Pyramids of the Moon and Sun, San Juan Teotihuacán, Mexico

The Pyramids build between AD 200 and 250 with an earth interior and volcanic rock, these famous landmarks are typical of Mesoamerican pyramids. Archaeologists have found various artefacts here – from deity figures to clay pots and animal bones – and some claim the tombs could have been used for ritualistic sacrifices. 


El Castillo, Chichen Itza, Mexico

El Castillo, Chichén Itzá, Mexico

Standing in the ancient Maya city of Chichen Itza in Mexico. This stepped pyramid was built by a late Mayan civilisation known as the Toltec people, roughly between AD 1050 and 1300. But it's also hiding a secret dating to AD 500 to 800. In addition to a second pyramid inside which was already known about, in 2016. 

El Castillo, Chichén Itzá, Mexico

Notable feature of El Castillo is the carvings of a feathered serpent, representing Maya deity Kukulcan. The temple has been built in such a way that during the spring and autumn equinoxes, the setting sun creates the illusion of a snake creeping down the staircases. 


Ziggurat, Ur, Iraq

Ziggurat, Ur, Iraq

Known as ziggurats, the pyramid structures of ancient Mesopotamia are distinctly different from those found in Giza, but they inspire a similar sense of work. The ziggurat in Ur a former Sumerian city in modern-day southern Iraq is the best-preserved and impresses with its angular walls, sharp-sloped stairways and thousands upon thousands of burnt-red bricks.

Ziggurat, Ur, Iraq

Measuring 64 by 46m across its base, this mammoth pyramid was built around the 21st century BC during the third dynasty of Ur, under the leadership of Sumerian king Ur-Nammu and his son Shulgi. Although the peak of the pyramid has not been preserved, it’s thought it would have housed a shrine to the moon god Nanna when it was built, taking the pyramid’s height to more than 30m.


Borobudur, Java, Indonesia

Borobudur, Java, Indonesia

Comprising 72 stupas, five large square terraces and 504 statues of Buddha, Borobudur is one of the world’s most celebrated Buddhist monuments. This tiered pyramidal-esque structure, located near Muntilan in central Java, was built between AD 778 and 850 using volcanic stone. 

Borobudur, Java, Indonesia

This magnificent temple was abandoned until it was found under a pile of volcanic ash and vegetation in the early 19th century. Takes eight-year restoration took place over a century later in the 1970s and 80s. The monument gained UNESCO World Heritage Status in 1991 and today, this pyramid in the Kedu Valley is the most-visited site in Indonesia. Buddhist monks can still be seen making pilgrimages to Borobudur and each of the temple’s three levels are believed to represent a stage on the journey to enlightenment.


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